Reach Out

© 2019 by Shake Energy Collaborative.

Are you a community organizer looking for help to enable your community to actively pursue renewable energy development? Contact us here!

Are you a renewable energy developer looking to partner to engage communities in a meaningful and beneficial way? Contact us here!

Are you interested in community energy, human-centered design, or also really enjoy electricity puns? Contact us here!

We seek to develop community solar alongside communities who need it most - those who spend a disproportionate amount of their income on their electricity bill. This pursuit first led us to the Hawaiian island of Moloka’i, where we support community outreach for a community solar project under development. Most recently, it has led us to Fresno, CA where we are now headquartered. We are immensely grateful for the (literally) warm welcome that both of these communities have granted us. We are especially grateful for the local knowledge and lifelong lessons that are shared with us as we continue to learn how to best tailor community energy projects to the people who call these places home. 
 

1

Shake Energy Collaborative is headquartered in Fresno, CA. The energy burden endured by many thousands of households in the Central Valley is unacceptable. Shake has dedicated our full fledged efforts to helping communities here build locally owned, locally designed solar farms that cut energy bills by 20% for families who need it most. We are humbled and inspired by the tremendous organizations throughout the San Joaquin Valley that are addressing related environmental justice issues. We welcome outreach from individuals or organizations who align with our mission to bring cleaner and cheaper energy to the valley. 

  • Our work in the San Joaquin Valley is supported by California’s legislation around environmental justice and access to solar for households who support themselves on a very tight budget. 

  • Specifically, our projects will be part of California’s Community Solar Green Tariff (CSGT) program which shares our vision for exceptional community engagement while building solar farms that are directly serving disadvantaged communities. 

 

We began working with the Moloka’i community in 2018 when we began our Masters research seeking to understand the role and importance of community co-design in energy development. The resolute commitment by the people of Moloka’i to sustain their environment, culture, and community have inspired the humility, the questions, and the respect we bring to each community that we have the privilege to work alongside.

  • The community of Moloka’i pays some of the highest electricity bills in the country, with a residential rate of over 40 cents per kWh in 2018, despite having the lowest average energy consumption per household in the state at under 350 kWh/month. Their high energy burden, commitment to a sustainable lifestyle, and strong sense of community made Moloka’i a perfect candidate for community solar. 

  • Our work here includes helping plan, host, and synthesize learnings from community meetings that were focused on the island’s first community solar farm. The 250 kW solar farm is under development by Groundswell, an inspiring non-profit community solar developer based in Washington, D.C. The project is in the queue for the first phase of the Community Based Renewable Energy Program, written by the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission and implemented by Hawaiian Electric Industries. We have partnered with Groundswell and local community liaison Emillia Noordhoek to explore new ways of ensuring that community energy on Moloka’i is built the right way: with the community’s voice and input guiding the entire development process. 

2

3

4

Sources:
  1. CPUC 2015. "Comparative Analysis of Utility Services & Rates in California". Accessed at https://www.cpuc.ca.gov/uploadedFiles/CPUC_Public_Website/Content/About_Us/Organization/Divisions/Policy_and_Planning/PPDComparativeAnalysisofUtilityServicesRatesinCAFinal.pdf
  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration, 2018. Electricity prices are highest in Hawaii but expenditures are highest in South Carolina. Published on: Feb 13, 2018. Accessed at: https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=34932.
  3. Maui Electric Company, 2019. Average Price of Electricity. Accessed at: https://www.mauielectric.com/billing-and-payment/rates-and-regulations/average-price-of-electricity
  4. Blue Planet Foundation, 2017. Energy Report Card. Accessed at https://blueplanetfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Blue-Planet-2017-Report-Card.pdf